Browsing Tag

storytelling

Featured, Moments, Things I Hope My Kids Will Read One Day, Uncategorized

Q. What does visiting my son, an antique store and zebra finches have to do with this image?

August 1, 2018

A. Everything.

I see stories — everywhere — and all the time. I feel blessed this is the case and I do know why. Besides loving to read, I grew up with some of the best storytellers that ever lived. Some are still here but most are gone now, and I owe them so much of my joy. All of my uncles, most of my aunts, my dad, my mom, all of my grandparents, (one grandmother would tell her stories for so long, that as little kids, we’d sneak out of the room before she was done. Hahaha!) However, I’m so grateful to her now. When I was growing up, I remember sitting around listening to the adults tell their stories — so many stories — these people lived life! Even the mundane was made funny and interesting (at least to me). One uncle (who could not hold a note) put his stories to music and whenever he would visit he would bring his guitar and “sing” his stories. I LOVED it! Many in my family are musicians, singers, dancers and so music was ever present. I have memories of my parents dancing to Motown in the living room, my mom having me sing for any company that showed up, singing at the missions with my sisters while my mother played the piano, and listening to my grandmother sing in church (so loudly that it would put Ethel Merman to shame).

Anyway, because of this wonderful cast of characters, I see in stories, and so when I went and visited my son recently, and he took me to a lovely breakfast, and then a walk around town, we wound up in this beautiful, upscale, antique store. In the store was an amazing birdcage (we’re talking the Taj Mahal of birdcages here) and in the cage were the most beautiful sounding zebra finches. I’d never heard a zebra finch before then, but they make the sweetest sounds, and those sounds and the birdcage drew me right in. I started thinking; one could imagine that they’d be some of the happiest captive birds while living in this beautiful cage, looking at all these beautiful things. They were even positioned in amazing light. But when I got in closer to take a better look, I realized, from their perspective, it was still just a cage and looked like it. They were just looking out onto beauty but not living it, you know? I was thinking hard about this (and hearing the song The Lark Ascending in my head) when my son said, “Mom, there are a lot of other things in this store.” Giggling a little, I had to agree, and we moved on but…this is how this image (and the finals from the shoot) came to be. Here’s how I explained it to those on set…

“Our little birdie finally got her wish to be human. Breaking out of her gilded cage she was finally able to live the free and glamorous life she had watched so many live in this room before.”

I imagined this image, but my husband brought it to life with his photographs. I like that about him. ☺

Grateful to all the crew, Christina, Jason, Steve and Viktor from KelbyOne, Julio and Kathy for photo assisting and to MJ for modeling, Hendrickje and Anna for makeup and hair and Julia for her unique and perfect dress. Such an amazing team. Here are the Instagram and social contacts if you’re interested.

Photographer: @scottkelby
Creative Director: @kalebrakelby
Production Company: @kelbyonepics
Producer: Christinam007
Model: @mjbutterly
Costume Designer: @xiaolindesign
Makeup Artist: @hendrickjemakeup
Key Hair: @style.hairandmakeup
Camera Assistant: @julioaguilar
Camera Assistant: @kathyporupski
Behind The Scene Stills/Video: @steven_nicolai_417
Behind The Scene Stills/Video: @darkrequest
Location: @rialtotheatretampa
Special Thanks: @thehiproom
Lighting by: @profotousa

You can see the entire shoot and final images at Scott Kelby’s Adobe Spark page.

Happy Wednesday everyone and I wish you stories.

Black and White, Featured, iPhone

Struggling with your photography storytelling?

April 28, 2018

“We ate well and cheaply and we drank well and cheaply and we slept well and warm together and loved each other.”
– Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

Pick up a good book.

It’s a fairly easy answer, but one I believe could make a world of difference to so many photographers struggling with their creativity. Think about it—if photography is storytelling, then you need to supply your imagination with many stories (tucked away in your sub-conscience) so that when the time comes to be creative, you have something to draw from. It is impossible for most of us to have lived enough really good stories, and even if we have lived some really good ones, even great ones, we only have our one lifetime to collect them. On top of that, how much of that life have we lived before becoming a photographer? However, if we read great literature, novels, and poems we can turn all those stories into a deep source for our own creativity. It’s similar to technically knowing how to operate your camera—you learned it well so that you don’t have to think about how to use it when you need or want to use it. In that same way, you will draw on the stories you have read (learned) when you go on to tell your photography stories. At the very least, it won’t hurt you, and you’ll have read some great books.

I wish you all the creative life you seek and I hope this helps some of you get a little closer. Have a great weekend everyone!

Kalebra

 

Black and White, Featured, Nature, Things I Hope My Kids Will Read One Day

White Rabbit Road

April 10, 2017

I was having lunch with a friend last week when she asked me what I look for when I go out to take a picture?…

Me: “Huh? You know, Kathy, I don’t really go out to take a picture. I’ve thought about this but what happens, really, is that I come up on a story and it excites me, fascinates me or stops me in my tracks with how beautiful I think it is and then I take a picture. Even if it’s just a moment story I’ll want to capture it. I giggle under my breath when someone calls me a photographer because I really feel like a story gatherer.” Hahaha!

I love stories. I love to hear them, have them told to me, read them, write them…

I come from a very large family and when I was young we gathered a lot and the kids would sit satellite around the adults and listen to them talk and tell their stories. True and some not true stories (at least, I hope they weren’t all true). Hahaha! They were about good times, great times, bad times, terrible times, funny things, sad things but whatever they were about (good or bad) they were always told, somehow, with fondness. Can you imagine? My mother, father, four uncles (heck, one of them wrote songs where he talked his stories over music), both of my grandmothers, grandfather, aunts…it’s amazing really to have so many in one family. My mom always jokes that it was because “we didn’t have money so that’s how we entertained ourselves.” Maybe but I think we were luckier than just not having money — those people were (and are) special and I’m so grateful for them and what they added to my life, to how I see things, to how I want to see things.

Like this moment story on the way back home from taking my Yittle to school. I turned the corner on a foggy morning and I could have sworn I saw my white rabbit (in his usual hurry) dashing off into the fog and trees. I just had to stop and let him know I noticed. 😉

Happy Monday everyone. 🐇