Browsing Tag

landscape

Featured, Nature, Travel

That one time when we could travel to Norway.

May 11, 2020
Lofoten Islands, Norway

“The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.” 
― Marcel Proust

I took this on our trip to Norway in June, 2018. At that time I was using the iPhone XS. I now count Norway (particularly the Lofoten Islands) among my favorite places to visit. There is a breathtaking stillness and the iPhone was made for the light that exists there.

Have a beautiful day…

With joy,
Kalebra

iPhone, Smartphone Photography, Tips

How to photograph during a pandemic.

May 7, 2020

Since you’re forced to slow down anyway, take advantage of it.

Like most smartphone photographers I find myself being the family historian—it’s only fair since we always have our cameras with us. And even though most of us aren’t thrilled about having to follow “shelter in place” guidelines we can still make the best of it by practicing and getting better at our photography. We’re most likely spending this time with our family and furry friends so let’s take advantage them! I mean, take advantage of the time.

Children and pets make great subjects while you’re practicing, but don’t try to force them to model. As the historian you can get some really genuine moments if you’re patient, and if your children and pets are like mine they won’t model anyway. Remember you’ve got time to just sit back and observe—photograph them when the moment is right.

If you’re indoors look for light (the softness of window light is the best). If you’re outdoors look for light (best times are morning and evening walks) think sunrise and sunset but because you have a smartphone you can prolong the sunset hours and look for nice shade if it’s too late after sunrise in the morning. And if you’re shooting in the middle of the day (not recommended but still can be done) I put myself and my camera in the shade—even if what I’m shooting is in direct sunlight. Also, foggy misty mornings or just after it rains are great times to run out and get some landscape shots.

Maki (seated) and Naminé
Misty morning walk.

Or try some flowers in your garden. You’re practicing—you can shoot whatever you want as much as you want. I would recommend not shooting the same subject exactly the same way over and over. If you feel you need more than one shot of something, change your angle and perspective. You’ll be glad you did when you go back to edit. Also, try some apps to add back what the camera didn’t capture. I absolutely love Lens Distortions. It’s perfect for enhancing the rain, mist and lens flares you capture. And I would recommend only enhancing at first, save putting in something that wasn’t there for later—much later.

Miss Magnolia and Lens Distortions

I’ll talk more about apps in another post but for now I hope this is helpful.

Have a great weekend everyone!

With joy,

Kalebra

Featured, iPhone, Nature, Things I Hope My Kids Will Read One Day, Tips

On Waiting…

June 25, 2018

My husband and I recently returned from a glorious trip to Norway. It is now one of my most favorite destinations, and if you were considering it, I highly recommend that you go. One of the things I wound up, most unexpectedly, falling in love with were the seagulls. They are very different from their thinner, fry chasing, cousins here in Florida in that they are big—very big—very healthy looking birds. They are also plentiful and seem to love being around people (very close) but not uncomfortably close. Hard to explain but they soar above and around a person with a subtle confidence that makes you feel at ease. I loved them! The photo above is of seagulls that followed our boat out to one of the Fjords. It was exciting because there were so many birds, flying so many patterns, and with so many amazing backdrops, and I knew, if I were patient, paid attention, and fired off enough shots that I would get something I liked. This photo above definitely qualifies as one of my favorites as these precocious birds wound up perfectly framing the landscape. I was lucky enough to get several well-timed images, and I credit them to waiting or actually, how I wait.

Waiting for things to line up the way I want used to be difficult for me until I discovered a secret. One day while I was waiting, I could feel my heart rate increasing as I felt myself getting anxious—and then it hit me…

I realized that, ultimately, what I wanted was to have the image—to have the bird, animal, subject or moment, captured. What I was most fearful about was not getting the image at all. I knew if I didn’t get it at the exact right moment—I might have waited too long and it (or the moment) would be gone. Aha! Figuring that out was key. So, what I’ve started to do is take a few (or more) shots before that all too critical moment so that I know I have it. I have something; even if it’s not perfect, I have it. Once I’ve taken a photo or two, the pressure is off, and I can relax and wait.

When using the iPhone (and it’s time to get a shot like this), it’s probably best to let the camera autofocus (you’ll know if that’s the case because you’ve already taken a few shots, remember?) Also, you’d better be taking advantage of Burst Mode—I use it all the time. Any iPhone above the 5 will take ten shots per second and will continue to fire as long as you press (and hold) the shutter button. Then, all you have to do is go through the images and pick your favorite.

I hope this makes your waiting a little easier and if you use the burst mode, you won’t miss a thing.

Have fun!

Kalebra

Personal Side Interviews

The Personal Side of Serge Ramelli

May 9, 2018

Photographer Serge Ramelli sees art in the world around him. Being an artist and having creativity is all about putting beauty out in the world – with many different ways of how to express it. Serge himself expresses art both through his photography as well as through acting and filmmaking. It was fascinating to hear the stories of how he got started, of his supportive family, and the dreams he’s still pursuing. His ambition is inspiring and motivating — I hope you’ll make time to watch the entire interview.

Merci beaucoup, Serge!

Kalebra

Tips

Wrote a tip about it. Want to hear it? Here it goes.

May 22, 2017

I had an inspiring (and motivating) conversation about this blog last Thursday, with Margie Rosenstein, one of our amazing graphic designers at the office. She told me that she had encouraged her daughter to come to my blog to find ways (and confidence) to shoot some examples of her work for a client. Wow, I felt so honored and then immediately I felt a little pang in my stomach because I realized that there just isn’t much here to help someone struggling or needing tips or guidance. My heart sank a little. Then on that Friday, Dianne Brisson, our rockin’ member services manager thanked me for sharing “the video tip” (how to shoot still images in video mode) with her because she had gone up in a hot air balloon and loved the results she had gotten with her iPhone. (By the way, her pics were awesome!) Well, the universe doesn’t have to hit me over the head (three times). Hahaha! So, I’ve decided to start posting some tips or background info every so often to be helpful. I’ll put them under a “Tips” category (as soon as I remember how to make a category in WordPress again). Lol! And, really, why not? I’m already going to be diving into the pool by recording a KelbyOne class at the end of this month. What?! Hahaha!

For now, here’s the tip! Well, two tips. Maybe three. Possibly four.

How to shoot with your iPhone, so you get a full screen, wider, with a little zoom shot. Don’t worry; it’s super easy. 😉

Above: When you take a regular photo using your iPhone camera app, the image doesn’t fill the width of the screen. It only takes up about 75% of the screen leaving black bars on either side.

Above: When you want a shot that fills the full screen where the image goes all the way to the edge (leaving no black bars), switch to video mode. When the video is engaged (turned on), a white button will appear right below the red record button, and that’s what you’ll use for taking stills. Because the still image is taken in video mode, the shot zooms to fill the screen and eliminates any bars.

Above: Now you’re shooting at the full width of the screen, but it’s a little zoomed in. If you want the photo to look like it originally did (or wider), you’ll need to step back a few (or more) feet to achieve the best of both worlds — a wider angle shot that also fills the screen, (like you see here). Compare that with the first shot, where the tips of Maggie’s front paws were cut off (that doesn’t sound right), the patterned throw pillow on the left was missing completely, and the red one on the right was mostly cut off.

One last thing, make sure you have your video recording set at the best quality possible. In the iPhone7plus (what I’m currently using) that would be at 4k recording. You choose that by going into your Settings, under Photos & Camera, under Record Video. *(Android note: I understand this technique works with Galaxy phones as well, so give it a try, and please let me know if that’s an accurate statement — it would be great if true). Shooting in video mode is particularly useful for landscapes like this sunset (pictured below), but btw, I shoot 90% of the time in video mode — landscapes or otherwise.

Ninja tip! Don’t forget to delete the space hogging videos you’ll create getting these stills. Ack! Anyway, I hope these types of posts will be helpful.

Have a great week everybody! 🙂